Archive

Posts Tagged ‘social media’

THE OCTAGON Partners with NMC to promote learning and healthy discussion among young Nigerians

Posted on: June 27th, 2017 by The Moderator No Comments

The first edition debate in collaboration with New Media Conference, featured 4 brilliant 11th graders representing CIS and DOWEN colleges Lekki, with the former proposing that Social Media does Enrich Education, and the latter opposing. The international debate format was employed, allowing for an interruption of the opposing speaker with remarks countering the stated arguments. The format also allowed floor speeches, providing the audience an opportunity to air their views and opinions on the subject matter without directly referring to the statements of the speakers.

It was an electric atmosphere as the audience were treated to an informative debate, by well-articulated speakers with a composure that can rival Barrack Obama. In attendance were the co-founders of the Octagon Mr Akinlabi Akinbulumo and Mrs Adaora Mbelu-Dania. Also present was Miss Tosin Ajibade, CEO of OSG communications. The team of Judges consisted of Mr Olaolu Ogundeji, Miss Chinwe, Mr IniOluwa Odekunle and Mr Jay Elone.

The debate kicked off with the moderator reading off the rules of the debate and the grading system.

The first speaker for CIS Jade Mkparu proposed that social media can enrich education, backing her statement by stating some educational benefits tied to social media, Most people are not aware that Wikipedia is indeed a form of social media as its content are a collective contribution of various peoples research and knowledge about various topical issues. Wikipedia has directly impacted millions of students worldwide. She further argued that there is a plethora of information available to students on YouTube including instructional videos, and documentaries. These videos are highly effective engagement tools that can make learning simple, practical and fun simultaneously. She rounded off commenting that, Social media is arguably an essential in these climes and proper social media education will ensure that its positive potential value will be derived from its use in classrooms.

Tekena Mac-yoroki the first speaker for Dowen College, in her opening remarks responded with scenarios, positing that social media ads can be a form of distraction for students who use the platform to learn, as the average attention span grows shorter and shorter. According to her, research has shown that Social media encourages poor writing as most students forget correct word spellings, due to prolonged use of social media slangs and shorthand when chatting and commenting, this is mostly evident after the long summer holidays. Add to the list of woes cyber-bullying and various forms of online harassment, stalking, invasion of privacy and phishing as students regularly post updates about their activities and the scales are tipped in a downward movement.

In her final point, she propounded that Social media can take away the feeling of being in a classroom, as students can get sucked into the false cocoon of online notoriety, trends and virtual friends, thus leading to a breakdown in social relations, evident in loss of confidence, awkwardness and social impropriety. All this ensures that students have low tendency to ask questions in the classroom and instead rely on social media platforms to provide answers, these answers are most often the personal opinion of the writer/poster without any credible or thorough research to undergird.

Next came the supporting speaker for CIS in the person of Kofo Jolaoso, she raised two points in favor of Social media use in classrooms including the possibility of tailoring lessons to various segments of students which is made possible by the different content sharing techniques of Social media and the gap bridged between students and their awareness about their environment through varied use of photos and contents. She ended strongly emphasizing that social media is the beginning of a new era for emerging students.

Olamide Odubena the supporting speaker for Dowen college followed immediately reiterating that social media is a major source of distraction and can be termed a colossal waste of time. She also spoke on the addictive nature of social media and its tendency to detach students from the real world where valid lessons are dished out every passing minute.

The floor was thrown open to the audience and the students held varying stances on the debated topic. At this juncture the moderator Mr Damola Adepetun congratulated both teams for an excellent show of professionalism, preparedness and quality presentation.

As a round up to the event, a short presentation on social media was delivered by one of the judges. Finally the winner and runner-up were announced, with prize presentations to the participants. CIS clinched the top prize followed closely by their colleagues in Dowen college.

It was an amazing time, an eye opener into the calibre of great minds the young generation possess, the majority stating how much they anticipate another showdown in the nearest future.

The Octagon remains committed to creating this kind of experience in order to raise the general level of thinking amongst people, until solutions and changes are precipitated.

Artists and the contracts they sign

Posted on: September 5th, 2016 by The Moderator No Comments

The Octagon: Welcome To The Octagon. 

We appreciate you taking time out to Join this Chat Session which will end at 7pm (1 Hour). We have two moderators in the room who will only offer guidance where necessary. Please feel free to openly share your thoughts and experiences. 

Let’s begin with some introductions before going into the discussion. Can everyone let us know who they are and share a bit about what they do ? Thank You. 

Gbubemi: Hi Everyone, my name is Gbubemi Fregene. I am Chef Fregz sometimes.

 Tyeng: Hello everyone. My name is Tyeng Gang, and at the moment I’m the program director for Urban96 Network (Radio).

Tobe:  Hi Everyone. My name is Tobechi Nneji. TobeDaDiva sometimes 😀. I am a presenter and content creator.

Uyi: Hello Everyone. My name is Uyi Osifo. I’m an artist manager and co-owner of Flux Factory Group.

Tobi: My name is Tobi Adeola. I’m a sponsorship specialist with Etisalat Nigeria

Eniola: Hello Everyone my name is Eniola Leyimu and I am an Intellectual property lawyer. Nice to e-meet you all.

Andre: My name is Andre Blaze Henshaw and I’m a broadcast creative and policy administrator.

Nike: My Name is Nike Fagbule. I am Chief Strategist and sometimes founder  at Zebra Stripes Networks, a Public Relations Company in Lagos, Nigeria. #ThatsAll.

The Octagon: ”As an artiste, you have hustled and chased the dream. Finally some record label, or an investor shows up promising you the ride of a lifetime, and checks so fat, that you could see money falling out of it. But before you sign on the dotted line, perhaps there’s a need to make sure you actually understand what you’re signing so your dreams of fame and fortune don’t turn into a nightmare.”

With the growth of the Nigerian entertainment industry comes more structure, and contractual agreements. In recent times, we have seen various artists and their labels/management looking to the court to solve disputes.

Do you think that Nigerian artists are generally overvalued or undervalued when it comes to contractual agreements ? Why do you think that Artists are continuously having issues with their labels/management ?  Finally, What are some of the things you think that every Nigerian artist should consider before signing contracts ?

Tyeng: Artist are so eager to have a ‘record deal’, they’ll sign almost anything. And you know ‘we’ don’t read terms and conditions.

Tobe: I think there is, maybe, an initial  ‘take-anything-I-can-get’ mindset on the part of the artists. They pretty much just sign anything, after they’ve been told some attractive figures and sold the ‘dream’. They hardly ever read and understand and negotiate other components of the contracts. Then they ‘grow a brain’ a few years down the line and want to level up the agreements and the investors don’t agree.

Uyi: But then again, you have investors coming into the business without a clue or an understanding of the business.

Tobi:  The entertainment industry is one the rise, but the corporate issues around it is still a concern. Beyond artists being desperate, you will notice after one or two hits, they instantly want to own a Label without really understanding the business side of music. Also regarding valuation of artists with respects to the contracts they sign, we really don’t have the data to measure the quality of contract and the value within it.

Nike:  I don’t think it is a case of read and understand. I think they really just want that big break and no matter what their lawyers or managers say. They just see how the money or platform can take them to the next level. You will hear a lot of ‘It is me that is in it not you’.

Tobe: @tobi and @uyi. I agree. So it’s a mix of ‘desperate’ artists and ‘unaware’ investors.  A classic case of bad cook and rotten tomatoes.

Uyi: The thing is, these artists are usually blinded by empty promises, the investor in most cases just wants to be famous and make money off the project ASAP. Usually this ends in a messy situation. The investor is expecting an ROI on every investment. This usually isn’t the case.

Eniola: There’s a famous saying in the music industry, that it all begins with a song. If there is no song, there can be no recording session or artist singing the song. A distinction not often made in the music industry in Nigeria is between the musical  composition and the sound recording. So for example, I can write a song for another artist. While I own the song, the artist or whoever pays for the sound recording owns it. This is where record labels come in, they usually pay for the recording. The question then is if their investment justifies what they get back.

Tyeng: These ‘Investors’. They aren’t trying to develop you, groom you, help you better yourself, improve you and the industry – Just make them money. That’s why the quality of music sucks. Song writers, producers, get nothing after, which is so sad.

Tobi: It’s OK for an investor to want to make money, for them it’s business. As you will see the Nigeria market is quite complicated and unregulated, content is not safe. Artists are now only able to make real money from endorsements and performance opportunities, and if they are good enough, they get to go on international tours. This and more are the new ways they are able to make some money, of which a part of it goes to the investor.

Uyi: @Tyeng, it’s just business, and I really don’t blame investors because they see the artist the same way they see their other investments. With regards artists being overly valued. A clear case is Skales whose buy out clause is £10,000,000.

Nike: Well. I think the buy out was not based on the value of said artiste. I think it was more to ensure that the contract is fulfilled.

Eniola: Traditionally, record labels could justify their wanting to take as much as possible because music was sold via physical copies. They also had the distribution networks under their control.  However in this day and age where most music is digital or live, and artists can promote via social media, can record labels still justify their take as much as possible approach? I do not think so.

Nike: And the sharp ones see a way to make quick money. Get that house in Banana Island and travel around. The others just keep waiting for when investor will wake up and remember that there is a label somewhere. Either way. They forget about the reason they set out to be artistes in the first place.

(Continue to the next page)

The Brand Ambassador / Influencer Dilemma

Posted on: July 25th, 2016 by The Moderator 8 Comments

 

Welcome to The Octagon.

See the profile of our guests in this Octagon room conversation

The Octagon: Let’s begin with some introductions before going into the discussion. Can everyone let us know who they are and share a bit about what they do? Thank you

Bayo: Good Afternoon People. I am Bayo Omishore. I write seldom.

Wale: My name is Wale Adetula (call me Tula). I’m the founder and CEO of thenakedconvos.com (Nigeria’s largest open digital publishing platform).

Toks: Hello people. I’m Ola-tokunbo. I’m a creative and a brand person.

Eddie: I’m Eddie Madaki, publicist and Marketing communications practitioner.  I work with iBlend Services/ EddieMPR IMC.

Eze: Hello all! My name is Ezegozie Eze, brand and content developer, specifically entertainment & lifestyle brands.

Chuka: Hi Everyone. I’m Chuka Obi, ECD at DDB Lagos

Tayo: Hi everyone, my name is Tayo. I work as a digital strategist with Ogilvy One.  I’m the founder of Isten Digital, recruitment and training in digital marketing. Partially into photography

The Octagon: Ground rules for branding are rapidly evolving.   Social media, content marketing, the younger generation, second screening, thought-leadership and the demographic shift are just some of the many things that are pushing brands to think differently. Customers want to identify with a brand they can grow with, that earns their trust and makes them feel valued. As a result, today’s competition among brands to capture the attention and hearts of their audience is really tough and challenging. This has forced so many organisations to adopt certain approaches to engage their market to transact with them. One of this approaches is the use of brand ambassadors and influencers.  Do you think that brand ambassadors truly help these brands and businesses grow , create greater sales and equity? What is wrong with way brands are going about this?

Wale: I don’t think brand ambassadors have helped a lot of the brands that have gone that way here in Nigeria and it’s mostly down to the reason why they made the decision in the first place. You just mentioned how the ground rules of branding/marketing is continuously evolving. Marketing needs to be way more intelligent nowadays and not based on emotions or who the MD of a particular organization likes or doesn’t. However, I think it is important to note that most of the success stories aren’t particularly exceptional cases. Signing on a brand ambassador so you can gain rights to his music (at a cheaper rate) is a no-brainer. And most of the so called success stories fall in this space.

Toks: I think the bitter pill most of us brand people who know, without a doubt, that the brand owners are going about brand ambassador-ship wrong is that it’s actually working for a few of these brands. Where the real issue is is that, a strategy works for company A and companies B, C and D rush to get on that bandwagon, regardless of whether it fits their brand or not.

Tayo: I agree with Toks. I think that brand ambassadors and influencers have their place in marketing. However, it’s the use of these resources that determine how useful they are to the brand. Brands do not really do brand fit. They just randomly pick people. I believe that ambassadors are mostly for awareness while influencers are for conversions.

Toyosi: Marketing has to evolve with the rest of the world and whether we like it or not using celebrities/influencers (real and imagined) is part of that evolution. People now use Instagram comedians eg I am Kanmi that was just mentioned as MCs for their shows because they know they can pull the crowd they want.

Bayo: I’ll speak from the perspective of a consumer who just so happens to have worked with a number of entertainment brands and say No. In the first instance, I question if the brand managers on the side of the product understand their own product enough to find a music brand that sufficiently mirrors their brand. For the sake of synergy. Or perhaps they sacrifice that on the altar of making a quick buck by hiring the guy that can attract the highest number of coins they can take a nice slice off.

Eddie: Bayo, I beg to differ. Most consumers purchases are won on an emotional level and the right influencer actually wins a larger market share for the product owner IF he/she has the ears,eyes and hearts of the target market the client is looking to penetrate. Now unfortunately since its the trend most agencies just pick anyone for personal/sentimental reasons and that’s when such campaigns are not effective. But if Brand influencer to market segment is a perfect fit, the campaign will work. And it’s cost effective and cuts across most media channels making for a much more organic way to connect with consumers

Bayo: That’s idealistic Eddie. What’s happening in reality is different. The question is, are mothers buying Pampers because of Tiwa? Or Pepsi because of Wizkid?

Wale: hahaha… Or are they even buying at all ?

(continued on next page)

Share

The Octagon | Gr8an | ©2017 All Rights Reserved